MOPS Kids Curriculum

We hope your children are coming home excited and happy to share all the stories, crafts, and activities they are doing in MOPS Kids each meeting. Please feel free to follow along with the lessons!

_________________________________________________

2016/2017 Curriculum Schedule

Sept.  1st & 8th                   Israel Demanded a King

Sept.  15th & Oct.6th         God Rejected Saul as King

Oct. 13th & 20th                 David was Anointed and Fought Goliath

Nov. 3rd & 10th                  David and Jonathan Became Friends

Nov. 17th & Dec. 1st          God Made a Covenant with David

Dec.  8th                             The Birth of Christ

Jan. 5th &12th                     David Sinned and Was Restored

Jan. 19th & Feb. 2nd          Solomon Asked for Wisdom

Feb. 9th & 16th                   Wisdom for God’s People

Mar. 2nd                              Solomon Built the Temple

Mar. 9th & 16th                   Solomon’s Sin Divided the Kingdom

Apr. 6th                               Story of Christ’s Crucifixion

Apr. 13th                             Story of Christ Overcoming the Grave

Apr. 20th                             Solomon Thought About Life

May 4th                              Job

May 11th                            Praises of God’s People

___________________________________________

Israel Demanded a King and God Rejected Saul as King
Bible Passages:  1 Samuel 8-10; 13:1-14; 15:1-35
Key Passage: Psalm 47:7

The Israelites wanted to be like the nations around them. They wanted a king. They did not realize they already had the best king of all–God.  Even so, God gave them what they wanted and chose Saul to be king. But, Saul was an imperfect king.  He disobeyed God and was thus rejected by God.

All earthly kings like Saul are imperfect.  But we can see how those kings point us to the perfect King, Jesus, who carried out His Father’s instructions without fail.  King Jesus never sinned, and He gave His life as the perfect sacrifice for us. 

David Was Anointed and Fought Goliath
Bible Passage: 1 Samuel 16-17
Key Passage: Psalm 47:7

After Saul was rejected as king by God, Samuel was sent by God to Bethlehem to meet Jesse and his sons. Samuel anointed the youngest of Jesse’s sons, David, to be the next king of Israel.  Years later, David found himself in a battle against the Philistines, and as his fellow Israelites cowered in fear of the great giant, Goliath, David stepped up and defeated the enemy with just a sling and a stone.

Apart from Christ, we are powerless before our enemies of sin and death.  None of us would step up like David.  Even if we tried we would fail on our own. David reminds us of Jesus, the greatest hero, who came to save us.  When we look to Jesus, He gives us salvation and eternal life.

David and Jonathan Became Friends

Bible Passage:  1 Samuel 18:1-12; 19:1-10; 20:1-42

Key Passage: Psalm 47:7

Following David’s slaying of Goliath,  King Saul’s son Jonathan dedicated himself to David.  He loved David as much as he loved himself, and the gifts he gave to him indicated that Jonathan recognized David as God’s choice for the next king, a position Jonathan could have rightly expected as Saul’s son.  However, King Saul was jealous of David and made many unsuccessful attempts to kill David.  Jonathan tried to convince his father not to kill David, but in the end the two friends departed from each other with great sadness for David had to flee for his life.

Jonathan laid down his rights as king, interceded on his behalf, and ultimately laid down his life.  Jonathan’s life gives us a glimpse of Jesus, the mighty friend of sinners.  Jesus left His position in heaven to come down to us.  He gave up His life to save us, and intercedes for us before God.

 God Made a Covenant with David

Bible Passage: 2 Samuel 7

Key Passage: 47:7

Things were not looking up for David, but God had appointed David to be king and God was faithful.  As the years went on, Jonathan was killed in battle against the Philistines and Saul fell on his own sword, and thus David became king of Israel.  Then David moved the ark of God to Jerusalem, and God promised to give the Israelites a place to stay so they wouldn’t need to move around anymore and rest from their enemies so they could stop fighting.

In this lesson we see the significance of David’s everlasting kingdom. God’s promise to David was ultimately fulfilled by his most significant descendant, Jesus Christ: “He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High, and the Lord God will give Him the throne of His father David.  He will reign over the house of Jacob forever, and His kingdom will have no end” (Luke 1:32-33).

 David Sinned and Was Restored

Bible Passage: 2 Samuel 11:1-12: 14; Psalm 51

Key Passage: Psalm 47:7

David intentionally positioned one of his soldiers, Uriah, in the most violent part of the battle so he would be killed, and then took Uriah’s wife, Bathsheba, for his own wife.  God knew David’s sin and sent Nathan the prophet to confront David and David then confessed his sin.

Like David, we need more than a changed lifestyle to be made right with God; we need new hearts.  Jesus died to satisfy God’s wrath against sin so that we could be made alive in Him. 

 Solomon Asked for Wisdom

Bible Passage: 1 Kings 2: 1-4, 10-12; 3: 1-15

Key Passage: Proverbs 2:6

David and Bathsheba had a son, Solomon, and God chose Solomon to be king.  Early in Solomon’s life his God-honoring qualities were apparent when God appeared to him in a dream and asked, “What should I give you?” First, Solomon humbly acknowledged his lack of experience in leading God’s people.  Then he said, “Give Your servant an obedient heart to judge Your people and to discern between good and evil.  For who is able to judge this great people of Yours?”

Solomon’s heart was surrendered to God.  God created people to do his will.  Jesus was greater than Solomon.  He completely trusted God with his life.  Jesus surrendered His own life to die on the cross for our sins so that God could bring us back to Himself. 

 Wisdom for God People

Bible Passage: Proverbs 1:1-7; 3:1-12; 4:10-19

Key Passage: Proverbs 2:6

When Solomon became king, God told Solomon he could ask for anything.  Solomon asked for wisdom and then he wrote down many wise sayings in the Book of Proverbs.  God empowered Solomon to lead God’s people well, and other kings and queens traveled from far away to learn from him.

The proverbs teach us that there are two ways to live:  a wise way and a foolish way.  God made the world and He knows how it works beset.  He made people and knows the best way for them to live and have joy.  Our sin makes us foolish, but wisdom comes from God. The gospel “seems foolish to those who are lost and dying.  But it is God’s power to us who are being saved” (1 Cor. 1:18). 

 Solomon Built the Temple

Bible Passage: 1 Kings 6-8

Key Passage: Proverbs 2:6

King Solomon began to gather materials and workers to build a temple for God.  When the time came for the temple to be dedicated all of the Israelites gathered in Jerusalem.  The priests brought the ark of the Lord to the most holy place, and a cloud filled the house of the Lord.  God’s glory filled the temple. Solomon prayed and praised God for keeping His covenant with David and recognized that God is not confined to a temple.

The temple was where God met with His people, and it gave God’s people a more permanent place to worship Him.  The priests followed specific instructions to approach God on behalf of His people.  Jesus changed everything when He died for our sins on the cross. By taking our sin upon Himself, Jesus made the way for sinners to come to God. 

 Solomon’s Sin Divided the Kingdom

Bible Passage: 1 Kings 11-12

Key Passage: Proverbs 2:6

Solomon gradually abandoned what he had believed and turned to false gods.  God planned to punish Solomon by taking the kingdom away from his family leaving only one tribe to Solomon’s son, Rehoboam.  God raised up enemies against Solomon and set apart one of Solomon’s servants, Jeroboam, to become leader over 10 tribes of Israel.  Israel rebelled against Rehoboam and made Jeroboam king thus dividing them into two kingdoms—Israel and Judah.

Every kingdom failed to lead God’s people perfectly.  God had a plan to send them a better king, a perfect king.  God would use the house of David to bring into the world His Son, Jesus, to become King over all of God’s people forever and lead them back to God.  

Solomon Thought About Life

Bible Passage: Ecclesiastes 1:1-11

Key Passage: Psalm 100:5

God made Solomon a wise king.  He ruled over Israel for over 40 years.  He wrote wise sayings in the Book of Proverbs and was respected by other kings and queens.  Though Solomon was considered to be “wiser than anyone else in the world” he pondered a key question: What is the meaning of life? The first chapter of Ecclesiastes describes the futility or vanity of life.

Ultimately, purpose and hope is found in Jesus, who died for our sins and rose again.  The reality of the gospel makes life worthwhile.  It answers the foundational questions about life.  In Jesus, we find purpose in this life and look forward to eternal life with Him. 

 Job

Bible Passage: Job 1-42

Key Passage: Psalm 100:5

Job was a good man who loved God, but big troubles began to happen to Job and he didn’t know why.  Robbers stole from him, his children died, and he became very ill.  Three friends came to visit Job and told him God was punishing him for his sin.  Job did not understand.  Then God came in a windstorm to talk to Job, and Job realized that God is much greater than people. God made Job well again, and he became richer than he had been before.

Job reminds us that following Jesus will be worth it.  God is good, present, and in control.  We can trust him when we don’t understand the pain we have to endure.  At the cross, God used the ultimate pain to bring about the ultimate good: our future and final salvation from sin.

 Praises of God’s People

Bible Passage: Psalms 1; 100; 110

Key Passage: Psalm 100:5

In the Bible, people wrote psalms, or songs, to God to tell Him how they felt.  We can read these songs in the Book of Psalms. God’s people met together and sang these psalms to worship God—to praise God when He gave them power to beat their enemies, to praise God for the wonderful things He created, and to praise God when He took care of them.  Sometimes people wrote songs when they were sad, and cried out to God to tell Him that they had sinned and God forgave them.

God hears us when we cry out to Him.  He has provided for the deepest longing of our hearts by giving us Jesus.